iPhone 8 Reviews Collected

I have not had any hands on experience with the new iPhone 8 as of yet but I will very shortly. In the meantime I have collected some of the reviews that are starting to appear. Most of them are very positive so I wanted to share them with my dedicated readers who are considering upgrading to the new iPhone. I hope to write an expansive review in early October.

So in the meantime check out these reviews of the iPhone 8.

The Verge reminds us that this IS an iPhone, and a very good one at that. However, the iPhone 8 isn’t the iPhone X, and therefore “it’s not the future, and it’s not the cutting edge”. It is, instead, “just the default”. Therefore, Nilay Patel “can’t think of a single compelling reason to upgrade from an iPhone7”.

Engadget describes the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus as “familiar-looking phones that mostly operate the way people expect them to”. In other words, “they’re conventional”. Chris Velazco calls the iPhone 8 an “incredibly powerful machine” which will appeal to “fans who want a blend of classic Apple style and top-tier performance”. But again, it’s no iPhone X.

TechCrunch focuses on the camera of the iPhone 8, with smartphone cameras being the focus of Apple’s attentions. Unfortunately, Matthew Panzarino suggests that the iPhone 8 “sits in the shadow of the iPhone X”. However, “a bunch of internal upgrades and a nice new glass back” make the iPhone 8 “the easy traditional choice this year”.

Wired describes the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus as “virtually perfect phones” which do everything required of them. However, they’re “already obsolete” as “the iPhone X looms large over the 8, with its tiny bezel and Face ID and amazing cameras”. Which leads David Pierce to suggest that “if you want to be part of the future, save your money for now”.

Mashable claims that while “the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are meaningful upgrades for many of Apple customers […] they should have been called the iPhone 7S and 7S Plus.” So Lance Ulanoff is happy to advise anyone who owns an iPhone 7 or iPhone 7 Plus to “save up a few more bucks and wait for the iPhone X when it ships in November”.

There you go, are you considering an upgrade to the iPhone 8 or are you going to hold off for the iPhone X which is being released in late October?

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iOS 11 Arrives

The iOS 11 release date is today, Tuesday, September 19, and it’s a big update for your current iPhone and iPad.

Apple’s new software update gives your smartphone or tablet a refresh, even if you’re not upgrading to iPhone X or iPhone 8. Your device will feel as good as new thanks to several iOS 11 features.

If you upgrade, you’ll be able to enjoy augmented reality, even more editing and adjustment options in the Photos and Camera apps, an improved Siri, and an all-new redesigned App Store (though, a word of warning, some older apps might not work).

Here on the east coast the download will be available after 1pm.

Be aware that there is going to be a massive strain on Apple’s bandwidth. If you’re not absolutely desperate for the upgrade, it might be sensible to wait a few hours before pressing Update. You’ll be able to enjoy a faster, smoother, and less troublesome upgrade experience.

How to Upgrade to iOS 11 (after 1pm EST today)

Back Up

Before giving your iPhone or iPad a nice little makeover, be sure your data’s all backed up. Uploading data to iCloud secures the basics like contacts, settings, and messages, but storage can be costly and it won’t save things like app preferences. For a more complete (and free) back-up, iTunes will save all the basics plus your apps, log-in credentials, and even your home screen arrangement. Plug your device into your computer, open iTunes, select your device, and choose “Back Up Now” under the “Manually Back Up and Restore.”

Fully Charged

You won’t be able to get all of iOS 11’s sweet new features if your device isn’t charged. You’ll also need to plug into an outlet and connect to Wi-Fi before you can start your download.

Make Sure You Have the Space

You’ll need about 2GB of free space to download the new OS. Make some room by deleting photos and apps you no longer need. Google Photos has a cool feature that automatically uploads your photos to its servers, and you can tell it to clear all the photos on your camera roll once they’re backed up. Do it ahead of time to save yourself the headache of frantically deleting stuff.

Get Started (after 1pm EST today)

Once you’re plugged in, backed up, and have space to spare, you’re ready to go. Your phone should notify you when the iOS 11 update is available, but if you’re feeling antsy, jump into the General tab in the Settings app and hit Software Update to start the download.

You can read my previous iOS 11 articles here to learn more.

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Apple’s iOS Gets a Release Date

I have been writing about the upcoming iOS 11 for a month or so now and today we finally were given an official release date from Apple.

As expected it will be released in a week and a half, on September 19.


iPhone and iPad users will get a redesigned look with a new customizable control center, better Siri, Live Photo modes, a one-handed mode for the keyboard and much more.

The Apple iPad is getting much better with iOS 11. iPad Pro will finally receive true multitasking and much improved Split View app support. The new Files app allows real file sharing between apps. Drag and drop is also available – finally.

Also new on the iPad Pro tablets is the new dock, which acts and looks just like the dock on macOS and is available in any app and any screen.

I am especially excited about this news!

watchOS 4 will also debut on September 19 with some neat new health and fitness features. The Apple Watch will monitor your heart rate in what Apple calls Apple Heart Study and will signal for any irregularities. Apple hopes this feature will be able to help identify heart disease in the future.

Apple Music is completely redesigned for watchOS and in unison with Apple Watch Series 3can be streamed without an iPhone present.

Apple unveiled its new Apple TV 4K and along with it, tvOS 11 with a bunch of new features and a redesigned UI.

Apple has incorporated 4K content from major studios as well as 4K streaming content from the likes of Netflix and others. Sports fans will see upcoming games at the top of their list and tvOS will even show live scores so that you can see if a game is close and decide to tune in.

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Preparing for iOS 11

Whether or not you’re getting a new iPhone from Apple this week, the company’s going to be giving you something. iOS 11, the software that powers iPhones and iPads, will be getting an update alongside the brand new phones.

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While iOS 11 doesn’t have the same spectacular iPhone features that have come in recent releases, it is a complete overhaul of the way that people interact with their iPads. And it packs in plenty of new features for your iPhone too.

The full release of the software will almost certainly come out this week or next. Usually, it comes out just a few days before the iPhone goes on sale – expect for next Friday – and of course it can’t come out any later than that.

HOW TO GET iOS 11

The recommended way is to tap Settings > General > Software Update and carry out the refresh from there.

Alternatively, you can connect the iPhone or iPad to a PC running iTunes and do the upgrade from there.

WHAT DEVICES CAN RUN iOS 11?

iOS 11 is supported on the following devices:

  • iPad Air
  • iPad Air 2
  • iPad Pro
  • iPad mini 2
  • iPad mini 3
  • iPad mini 4
  • iPod touch 6th
  • iPhone 5s
  • iPhone SE
  • iPhone 6/6 Plus
  • iPhone 6s/6s Plus
  • iPhone 7/7 Plus

This means that not all devices that run iOS 10 can run the iOS 11. Specifically, the following are not supported:

  • iPhone 5
  • iPhone 5c
  • iPad 4

This means that the oldest Apple devices that can support iOS 11 will be the iPhone 5s and iPad Air.

REMEMBER: THINGS CAN GO WRONG!

Before you go hog-wild, throw caution to the wind and start upgrading, be aware that there are risks. Things can go wrong, stuff may be broken, and you may lose data. Plenty of iOS launches have been marred by bugs and problems, so with that in mind, it’s a good idea to have an up-to-date backup, because making a fuss isn’t going to bring back your lost photos or documents.

You can either create a local backup using iTunes, or backup to iCloud by going to Settings > iCloud > Backup, and then turning on iCloud Backup.

Keep in mind that unless you’re willing to jump through hoops and do things that Apple frowns upon, going to iOS 11 is a one-way trip, so you might want to let other people to go ahead of you just in case there are gotchas

SPRING CLEAN YOUR iPHONE OR iPAD

Chances are that your iPhone or iPad has accumulated a lot of detritus over the months and years, so what better time to get rid of it than now.

While iOS 11 doesn’t need as much free space to install as some of the earlier releases of iOS, getting rid of apps that you no longer use — or perhaps have never used — makes good sense.

KNOW YOUR PASSWORDS

Following the upgrade, you’ll need to enter your iCloud password in order to be able to reconnect to all your data and photos. If you don’t have this close to hand — remember, having it on the device you’re upgrading isn’t all that convenient — then this might be a good time to do that.

Also, if your iTunes backup is encrypted, then remember you’ll need that password if something goes wrong!

PREPARE YOURSELF FOR THE END OF SOME OF YOUR OLD APPS

The end is coming for all 32-bit iOS apps, so if you’re still relying on older apps, it’s time to find alternatives.

For some time now, Apple has been warning iPhone and iPad users that legacy 32-bit apps may slow down their devices, but with the recent release of iOS 10.3, Apple has escalated things by making it clear that the end is nigh.

You can check installed apps for compatibility using the built-in checker tool (you need to be running iOS 10.3 or later for this to work).

You can find that by clicking: Settings > General > About > Applications.

From there, you’ll get a list of all the 32-bit apps on your iPhone or iPad that won’t run on iOS 11. If you’re lucky, you won’t have any apps listed, or the apps that are listed will be old stuff that you forgot you had installed and no longer use.

However, if an app that you are relying on is listed, then you need to get ready for its demise.

IS IT BETTER TO UPGRADE OR WIPE THE DEVICE AND START FROM SCRATCH?

It’s a lot less hassle to just upgrade a device because you get to keep all your apps and settings.

However, devices that I have wiped and reloaded a new iOS onto, and then installed and re-setup all my apps and such, feel faster and seem to suffer from fewer problems (such as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi issues). However, wiping and reloading the apps and data is pretty big hassle, and it’s probably more work than most want to undertake.

SHOULD I WAIT A WHILE BEFORE DOING THE UPGRADE?

There will likely be an update or two to iOS 11 coming down the pipes over the coming weeks, so you might want to wait for the dust to settle and for any last-minute bugs to be squashed before making the leap, especially if you rely on your device.

Also, if you use your device in a BYOD setting, make sure you get the OK from the IT department before upgrading, in case you’re unable to access the network or data you need.

 

 

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Prepare for iOS 11

If you have a iPhone or iPad prepare for a really big iOS update in early to mid-September. If you want to get ready for a big change to your iOS device take a look at 13 things that you will love after you mobile device is updated.

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1. Live Photos will be much better.

Now you can make your live photos into GIFs, which you can make bounce back and forth. Also, you can finally choose which still frame of the Live Photo is the main image, making it easier to find the perfect moment to share on social media.

2. You’ll be able to store way more photos and videos on your phone.

Apple is changing the compression formats in iOS 11, which will allow you to store more photos and videos on your phone. Apple says you’ll be able to save twice as many photos and videos on your device than in iOS 10.

3. The App Store is getting a much-needed face-lift.

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Apple is finally bringing the design language it established for newer apps like Music and News to the App Store itself.

Not only did Apple make the App Store look cleaner, with better, bolder text, it also changed its organization. Now everyone will have a personalized “Today” tab to highlight unique apps and games.

And speaking of games, Apple has finally dedicated a full tab of the App Store to games, making new or notable ones much easier to find.

4. The Messages app is getting cleaned up.

It felt like mayhem when Apple added the app drawer to its Messages app. Suddenly, you could add stickers and GIFs and all sorts of buttons and visuals to your messages, but all the new options weren’t easy to find and were somewhat overwhelming. Apple redesigned the app drawer in Messages for iOS 11, making it much easier to browse all the various stickers and emojis at your disposal.

5. Siri sounds more natural and can translate for you.

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Apple says Siri is going to get much more advanced through machine learning and artificial intelligence — it’s unclear whether these changes would make Siri better to use, but at the very least, Apple has made Siri sound a bit less robotic and more natural, a bit like Amazon’s Alexa assistant.

And Apple is also testing a cool translation feature for Siri, where if you ask the assistant to say a certain phrase in a different language, like Chinese or Italian, it will speak on your behalf in the desired language.

6. The iPhone keyboard is getting smarter.

A signature feature of Google Now is finally coming to the iOS ecosystem: When you type in iOS 11, the keyboard will suggest words you may have recently viewed on your phone — from your Messages app, for example, or Safari. So when your friend texts you the name of a restaurant, it may be one of the first suggestions when you start searching for that restaurant on the web.

Also, you’ll be able to use the keyboard with one hand — just hold the emoji key and select one-handed typing to move all the keys closer to your thumb.

7. Apple is finally letting you manage your Control Center.

The Control Center was perhaps the most useful feature of iOS 7, released in 2013. By swiping up from the bottom of your screen, you could access a variety of shortcuts and buttons. Four years later, you’ll finally be able to choose what those shortcuts and buttons are.

8. Notifications are getting simplified.

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In iOS 11, all your notifications — both recent and missed — are in one place, with no separate tabs. Just pull down from the top of the screen to see everything at once.

9. There’s a new feature that could actually save your life.

Distracted driving is a real, deadly problem. Apple has added a clever feature that triggers Do Not Disturb mode when the iPhone is in the car to hide notifications for texts, calls, and other apps while you’re driving. The feature can even notify people that you’re driving and will contact them soon.

10. Apple Maps are better, indoors and out.

Apple is adding indoor maps for hundreds of airports and shopping centers around the world, making it much easier to navigate your local mall.

And speaking of navigation, Apple has finally added lane guidance to Apple Maps for more precise turn-by-turn directions.

11. Setting up a new iPhone or iPad is much easier.

If you just bought a new iPhone or iPad, you can hold it close to an iOS device you already own to magically import all your settings, preferences and iCloud Keychain passwords. It helps you start using that brand-new device much more quickly than before.

12. The volume box is moving out of your way.

When you change the volume on your iPhone or iPad, a translucent box pops up in the middle of the screen. It’s a bit annoying, so Apple is redesigning the volume box in iOS 11. Here’s how it’ll look: Much better.

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13. You can instantly share Wi-Fi passwords.

Soon, you’ll no longer need to save your Wi-Fi password on a wrinkled piece of paper in a drawer somewhere. In iOS 11, if you need a Wi-Fi password for a given network, just find someone who is already using it and hold your device near theirs to transfer the password instantly.

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iOS 11 Beta – Not Ready for Prime Time

I’ve had a lot of people ask me about the iOS 11 public beta. As always I installed a beta from a popular OS (iOS & Windows) so you don’t have to. In respect to Public Beta of iOS 11 I decided to run the operating system on my iPhone, which has turned out to be a terrible decision.

I’ve been running it for a little over a week now, and what a painful week it has been.

Image result for ios 11 public beta

Yes, iOS 11 brings with it a number of improvements, mostly in the form of user interface tweaks such as an improved Control Center, and a raft of new features such as screen recording and augmented reality support.

But the iOS 11 public beta also brings with it a lot of pain and suffering.

Now before you start bashing at your keyboards yelling at me – telling me about how this is a beta and that’s to be expected from a beta, take a deep breath. I have been running beta versions of Windows and iOS for years. So – yes, I know it’s a beta, and I went into this with my eyes fully open.

For a public beta, this release is really – really flakey and temperamental, and the worst I remember from Apple in years. Not only is it buggy, crashy, and incredibly slow, but a lot of stuff is also badly broken. I’ve seen a whole host of bugs, ranging from Control Center bugs, notification bugs, camera bugs, and Wi-Fi, cellular, and Bluetooth all seem unstable in this release. One major problem is that text messaging crashes often while typing. Talk about frustrating!

I wouldn’t call any of the bugs show-stopping, but it definitely feels like death through a thousand cuts.

It also breaks apps. I don’t mean the old 32-bit apps that have been on the chopping blockfor some time, but apps that worked fine under iOS 10 are really buggy under iOS 11. Crashes are way up, and I’m also seeing a lot of weird UI bugs, even in well-established apps such as Google Chrome.

Even browsing with Google Chrome is currently broken.

Oh, and before you ask, battery life is terrible.

It seems app developers are going to have to do a lot of work to make their offerings ready for iOS 11. And they only have a few weeks to do it.

If you are still desperate to try out the iOS 11 beta and don’t have access to an old device that you can sacrifice, I strongly recommend taking many precautions, which will protect your data and also give you a way back to iOS 10 if you decided you’ve had enough. However I strongly recommend avoiding this public beta.

But my advice for now is that unless you’re a developer, just steer clear of iOS 11 for now. It’s just not worth the headache, and will just leave you feeling sad, angry, or frustrated.

Apple has a lot of work to do ahead of the September release.

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iOS 11 Arrives on My iPhone!

The moment I have been waiting for is finally here. iOS 11 public beta 1 has been released, which means I was finally able to install it on my iPhone. It was fairly effortless to upgrade to iOS 11 from my existing iOS 10.3.2 installation.

As always I am placing my iPhone at risk so you, my dedicated readers don’t have to. What will the new iOS bring to your iPhone? Here is what I have found since I updated mine with the iOS 11 Beta.

Image result for ios 11 public beta

What Does iOS 11 Change?

The iOS aesthetic has undergone some major changes over the years, but that’s not really the case here if you’re using an iPhone. In fact, you’d be hard-pressed to find a difference until you swipe up in search of that flashlight. The iOS Control Center no longer looks like a handful of pages with quick options; it’s a more condensed cluster of buttons and controls that you can finally customize. I appreciate Apple squeezing all of this functionality into one place; it generally works well, and if your iOS device supports 3D Touch, you can press on these icons to access more controls. That said, I’ve already screwed up my screen brightness while trying to close Control Center maybe a thousand times, and I’m not sure I love the look either.

You can also view all your recent notifications from the home screen just by swiping up from your lock screen, which is nice if you need to get caught up on things quickly. That said, if you’re a digital pack rat (like me) and never clear your notifications, this is a great way to see iOS lag.

You’ll also see a big focus on big text: It’s meant to be clear and visually punchy, but if you didn’t like the Apple Music redesign, you’re probably not going to like this either. That bold approach is used everywhere to some extent, from the Messages app to your list of albums in Photos. The best new example, however, is the revamped App Store. It’s not just a place with lists of apps (though those still exist) — it’s more curated, and there’s a strong editorial bent. Featured apps get miniature articles (crafted with help from the developers), lots of big imagery, and more video to help explain what makes them so special. It kind of feels like Apple squeezed a teensy blog into the App Store.

And for the first time, games and apps are kept separate from one another. Sifting through these distinct lists is definitely more convenient than before, but it mostly benefits developers. With these lists now separate, apps won’t get pushed down in the Top Paid and Free lists by whatever the buzzy game of the moment is.

A Smarter iOS

Apple’s pushing the concept of “intelligence” really hard with this release. With Core ML, developers will be able to weave machine learning features into their apps, and hopefully make them more responsive to our desires and behaviors. Too bad none of those apps are ready yet. There’s still one concrete example of Apple’s pronounced focus on intelligence here, though: Siri.

For one, it sounds profoundly more natural than before. There are still small tells that you’re talking to a collection of algorithms, but the line between listening to Siri and listening to an actual person is growing strangely thin. (You’ll notice the improved voice in other places too, like when Apple Maps is giving you directions.) Hell, Siri even sounds good when you ask it to translate something you’ve just said in English into Spanish, French, German or Chinese.

It’s also able to act on more unorthodox requests like “play me something sad,” which happens to launch a playlist called “Tearjerkers.” And if you’re tired of hearing Siri altogether, you can now type queries and commands to it instead. Unfortunately, you’ll have to disable the ability to talk to Siri in the process. Ideally, Apple wouldn’t be so binary about this, but there’s at least one workaround. Worst-case scenario, you can enable dictation for the keyboard, tap the button and start chatting with it.

If some of this sounds familiar, that’s because Siri actually has a lot in common with Google Assistant. While the feature gap between the two assistants is closing, Google is still better for answering general-purpose questions. Apple’s working on it, though. The company says Siri now pulls more answers from Wikipedia, which may be true, but you’ll still just get search results most of the time.

More important, the underlying intelligence that makes Siri work has been woven into other apps. Siri can help suggest stories you might be interested in inside the News app, and if you register for an event within Safari, Siri will add it to your calendar.

Going Social with iOS 11

Sometimes I wonder why Apple doesn’t just go all out and create its own social media service. Then I remember it did. It was called Ping, and it flopped hard. So it’s a little worrying to see Apple bake a stronger social element into Apple Music. At least the company’s approach this time is based on delivering features people actually use. In addition to creating a profile (which only partially mattered before), you can now share your playlists and follow other users. Sound familiar? Well, it would if you were a Spotify user. Apple’s attempts to stack up more favorably against major social services doesn’t end here, either.

With the addition of new features, iMessage has become an even more competent competitor to apps like Line and Facebook Messenger. You want stickers and stuff? Apple made it easier to skim through all of your installed iMessage apps, so you can send bizarro visuals to your friends quickly. You’ll get a handful of new, full-screen iMessage effects for good measure, and it’s not hard to see how the newfound ability to send money through iMessage itself could put a dent in Venmo’s fortunes.

And then there’s the most social tool of all: the camera app. The all-too-popular Portrait mode has apparently been improved, though I’ve been hard-pressed to tell the difference. (It’ll officially graduate from beta when iOS 11 launches later this year.) You’ll also find some new filters, but the most fun additions are some Live photo modes. You can take the tiny video clip associated with a Live Photo and make it loop, or reverse itself, or even blur to imitate a long exposure. Just know this: If you try to send these new Live Photos to anyone not on iOS 11, they just get a standard Live Photo.

iPad Focus

The new update brings welcome changes to iPhones, but it completely overhauls the way iPads work. This is a very good thing. Thanks in large part to the dock, which acts similar to the one in macOS, they’re much better multitaskers. You can pull up the dock while using any other app to either switch what you’re doing or get two apps running next to each other.

Just drag an app from the dock into the main part of the screen and it’ll start running in a thin, phone-like window. Most apps I’ve tested work just fine in this smaller configuration, since they’re meant to scale across different-sized displays. And you can move these windows apps around as needed. To get them running truly side by side, just swipe down — that locks them into the Split View we’ve had since iOS 9.

Having those apps next to each other means you can drag and drop images, links or text from one window into the other. This feels like a revelation compared with having to copy and paste, or saving an image to your camera roll so you could insert it somewhere else. Now it just needs more buy-in from developers. Literally all I want to do sometimes is drag a photo from the new Files app into Slack to share it, but that’s just not possible yet.

Oh, right, there’s a Files app now. It’s another one of those things that do what the name implies: You can manage stuff you’ve saved directly on your iPad, along with other services like Dropbox and Google Drive. Those third-party integrations are sort of theoretical right now, though: Dropbox sync isn’t ready yet, and navigating your Google Drive doesn’t really work the way it’s supposed to. It’s a great idea in concept, and I can’t wait to try it when it actually works.

When you’re done dragging and dropping, one upward swipe on the dock launches the new multitasking view. The most annoying part of this new workflow isn’t how your recent apps are laid out as a grid instead of the usual cards. No, it’s that you can’t just swipe up on those cards to close an app like you used to; you have to long-press the card and hit a tiny X to do that. I get that it’s more akin to the way you delete apps, but the original gesture was so much more intuitive and elegant. Otherwise, sifting through open apps to pick up where you left off is a breeze.

That said, it’s odd to see the Control Center to the right of those app windows. Having all these extra control toggles shoved into the side of the screen looks kind of lousy to me, but don’t expect that to change anytime soon. Thankfully, there’s no shortage of thoughtful touches on display here. Consider the new on-screen keyboard: Instead of tapping a button to switch layouts for punctuation and numbers, you can just swipe down on a key to invoke the alternate character. I still haven’t gotten completely used to it, but I’m much faster than I was on day one. Hopefully, your muscle memory resets more easily than mine. The Notes app also has been updated with the ability to scan documents on the fly, which has already made my life easier when I’m filing work expenses.

And don’t forget about the Apple Pencil. It was always kind of a hassle going through multiple steps before I started writing a note — you had to unlock the iPad, open Notes and tap a button to enable pen input. Now I can just tap the lock screen with my Pencil and I’m already writing. Longtime readers probably know my handwriting sucks, but it’s generally clean enough for iOS to parse it, so I can search for things I’ve written straight from Spotlight. Tapping a result brings up my note, and, even in its unfinished state, it’s honestly a little crazy how fast Apple’s handwriting interpretation works. Then again, Apple is pushing on-device machine=learning processes like this in a big way, so if we’re lucky, behavior like this will be the rule, not the exception.

These are all valuable improvements, and I’m sure I’ll wind up using these features a lot. At this point, though, I still wouldn’t choose an iPad over a traditional notebook or convertible as my primary machine. The situation will improve as more app developers embed support for all these features into their software, but the foundation still doesn’t seem to be as flexible as I need.

Little Changes That Matter

As always, there are lots of little changes baked into these releases that don’t require a ton of words. Let’s see…

  • There’s a handy one-handed keyboard in iOS 11, but it’s disabled by default. I have no idea why.
  • When you’re on a FaceTime call, you can now take a screenshot of what you’re seeing without that pesky box with your own face in it.
  • Do Not Disturb While Driving is good at knowing when you’re using an iPhone in a car — just be sure to add a toggle for it in the Control Center for when you’re a passenger.
  • It’s basically impossible to miss when an app starts using your location: You’ll see a blue banner at the top of the screen telling you as much.

Even in its unfinished state, iOS 11 seems promising, especially for iPad users. I’ve always maintained that iOS 10 was a release meant to weave Apple’s sometimes disparate features and services into a platform that felt more whole. It was maybe a little unglamorous, but it was necessary. When iOS 11 launches in the fall, we’ll be able to get a better sense of its character and value.

 

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iOS 11 Looks to Save Lives

What took so long for this…

When you’re driving, it’s all too easy to become distracted by a notification popping up on your smartphone.

But that distraction could soon be a thing of the past with Apple’s latest iOS update.

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Apple announced yesterday at its WWDC conference that it is launching a ‘Do Not Disturb While Driving’ feature that will automatically prevent notifications from popping up when it senses that you are in the car. I applaud this new feature and hope to see it in all mobile devices sooner then later.

The feature will be rolled out worldwide as part of Apple’s iOS 11 update later this fall.

The announcement of the feature comes just six months after Apple was sued for not including one like it.

The case involved a fatal car accident that was caused by a driver who was using FaceTime at the time of the crash.

Do Not Disturb While Driving can detect when your phone is connected to a car using Bluetooth or a cable, or if the car is moving, and withhold any notifications that could distract you.

This includes text messages, WhatsApp messages and news updates.

The iPhone screen will also lock to prevent drivers from accessing their apps while driving.

The feature is optional for passengers in the car, who can choose to disable it if they would like.

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