Smartphones Devouring Our TV Time

The recent announcement from CBS that there will finally be a new “Star Trek” TV series but unlike any major network television series before it – it will boldly launch and live exclusively on a streaming service, in this case CBS All Access.  At first I am sure many fans of the 50 year old franchise were probably left scratching their heads about this decision. However CBS is only reacting to something we all know is happening on the TV landscape. Network TV (ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, PBS) as we have know is in the final throws of dominance and will more then likely fade away completely in the next decade or two.

You can see by the following from Nielson that CBS is on the right track with their most watched TV series of all time and what to do with it going forward.

Our Smartphones Are Eating Our TV Time

The use of Internet-ready devices like smartphones appears to have seriously cut into American’s traditional TV-watching time, new Nielsen data shows, potentially undercutting the notion that mobile devices merely serve as “second screens” while people are plopped in front of the set.

Data provided to The Associated Press shows that the number of 18-to-34-year-olds who used a smartphone, tablet or TV-connected device like a streaming box rose 26 percent in May compared to a year earlier, to an average of 8.5 million people per minute.

By contrast, the numbers of those in the same age group who watched TV, listened to radio or used a computer fell 8 percent over the same period to 16.6 million people per minute.

Nielsen’s inaugural “Comparable Metrics” report for the first time presents data on average use per minute, making it possible to directly compare the time people are spending on their various devices.

The audience for TV viewing alone fell by 10 percent, to 8.4 million people a minute in the 18-to-34-year-old category. That fall-off in the younger audience highly coveted by advertisers confirms a trend in other Nielsen data that found traditional TV viewing peaked in the 2009-2010 season.

“It’s pretty clear the increased use of mobile devices is having some effect on the system as a whole,” said Glenn Enoch, Nielsen’s senior vice president of audience insights. The new Nielsen data doesn’t break out time spent specifically on streaming TV, since that usage is likely spread across TV-connected devices, phones, tablets and PCs.

Since Nielsen inaugurated its tracking service in 1949, average daily TV viewing has marched steadily upward, from 4 hours and 35 minutes a day to a peak of 8 hours and 55 minutes in 2009-2010. That increase coincided with growing numbers of TV sets sold and the proliferation of programming on cable channels.

But viewership has been edging down ever since. From late September until mid-November this year, daily TV watching accounted for only 8 hours and 13 minutes, Nielsen said.

A Logical Choice

This information from Neilson as well as the overall downward trend of conventional TV viewership for services like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime are indeed proof that it is most logical that the Star Trek franchise will live long and prosper only by embracing new technology which that goodness it appears to be doing.

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HBO & CBS Brighten Cord Cutters Hopes

Cable TV as we know it is about to change in a big way. “Cable Cutting” is something many frustrated people are turning to. This is simply the result of the ever rising cost of cable TV and at the same time decreasing levels of poor customer service. For example Comcast every year is ranked as the worse company in respect to customer service and even ranks lower then the U.S. Congress which is truly amazing.

The best corporations are those who can see the future and move towards it as opposed to sinking their heels in trying to delay the inevitable. This is is what has been happening with cable networks for years. However with the ever growing popularity of servcies like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime change is in the air.

Recently two major networks, HBO and CBS have announced a major change in what and how they offer their programming.

CBS All Access

CBS and HBO hope to capture subscribers by offering a slightly lower rate than the Hulu Premium monthly fee by offering a back catalog of nostalgia-minded past programming, and by offering a more complete lineup on current programs  including some less popular shows that cannot be found elsewhere.

You can learn more about the new CBS All Access service here. We are still waiting on more details regarding HBO’s announced subscription service.

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