Afghanistan’s internally displaced families are living in Kabul parks

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Afghanistan’s internally displaced families are living in Kabul parks

A colorful colony of tents are occupying the dust parks in Afghan capital, home to a countless number of families who fled the Taliban when they rolled into their villages last month.

Tens of thousands fled the country as the deadline for the withdrawal of U.S. troops drew near, but the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) estimates a half a million people have been displaced internally in recent months and has warned that the number could grow if health services, schools and the economy break down.

“All the people have become poor. It is enough that we are tired of this war. It has been a war for almost 40 years. What can we do? We want a government that is Islamic, safe, and peaceful,” Azizullah, an internally displaced person from Takhar province said.

Even before the Taliban launched its final push to seize control, three million Afghans were already displaced in a country struggling with drought and the COVID-19 pandemic, and where nearly half the population received some form of aid.

A U.N.-sponsored high-level ministerial meeting on Afghanistan is due to be held this week and seek to raise USD 606 million to provide life-saving humanitarian assistance to nearly 11 million people until the end of the year.

A medical staff check the children of a burqa-clad women during a free medical camp for internally displaced people at Shahr-e-Naw Park in Kabul on september 11, 2021.
A medical staff check the children of a burqa-clad women during a free medical camp for internally displaced people at Shahr-e-Naw Park in Kabul on september 11, 2021.

Children play at a park in Kabul, Afghanistan, Friday, Sept. 10, 2021.
Children play at a park in Kabul, Afghanistan, Friday, Sept. 10, 2021.

Children play on parallel bars installed at Shahr-e Naw Park in Kabul on September 9, 2021.
Children play on parallel bars installed at Shahr-e Naw Park in Kabul on September 9, 2021.

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