Airstrikes against Cuban regime should be considered, Miami Mayor Suarez says

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Airstrikes against Cuban regime should be considered, Miami Mayor Suarez says

The mayor of Miami, Florida, has called on the US to consider military action to overthrow the Communist regime in Cuba — even if that means launching airstrikes.

Francis Suarez — whose father was Miami’s first Cuban-born mayor — told Fox News on Tuesday that “what should be being contemplated right now is a coalition of potential military action in Cuba.”

He highlighted previous US military action in Panama, Kosovo and Pakistan, the latter of which “probably saved thousands” of lives by killing Osama bin Laden when President Biden was vice president.

“Are you suggesting airstrikes in Cuba?” Fox News host Martha MacCallum asked.

“What I’m suggesting is that that option is one that has to be explored and cannot be just simply discarded as an option that is not on the table,” Suarez insisted.

Cubans take part in a demonstration in support of Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel's government in Arroyo Naranjo Municipality, Havana
Cubans take part in a demonstration in support of Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel’s government in Arroyo Naranjo, Havana.
AFP via Getty Images

“That’s something that needs to be discussed and needs to looked as a potential option in addition to a variety of other options that can be discussed.”

He later told the Miami Herald that he was expecting a call from the president — and planned to ask him to consider military intervention.

“It’s difficult for any elected official, Republican or Democrat, not to take the side of the Cuban people when they see images of people risking their lives, protesting in the streets,” he said of the mass demonstrations.

Government supporters gather in front of National Capitol building
Suarez also stressed that “the Cuban people are not asking for the lifting of an embargo” enforced by the US.
Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

He also stressed that “the Cuban people are not asking for the lifting of an embargo” enforced by the US, which Cuban officials and many on the left have blamed for the protests.

“They’re not yelling out, ‘End the embargo.’ They’re not yelling out, ‘We need food.’ They’re yelling out, ‘We want liberty, we want freedom,’” he told MacCallum.

“They’re going out on the streets every single day talking about the failure of the Communist regime to provide for its people. And it has failed for six decades,” he said.

Since protests broke out in Cuba over the weekend, thousands have also taken to the streets of Florida, home to the largest US population of Cuban Americans — closing down a number of major roads on Tuesday.

State Troopers stand guard as people block Palmetto Expressway during a protest showing support for Cubans demonstrating against their government, in Miami.
State troopers stand guard as people block Palmetto Expressway during a protest showing support for Cubans demonstrating against their government, in Miami.
AFP via Getty Images

As hundreds of others also rallied at a Miami park, a large group shouted support for the Cuban protesters as they blocked traffic on Miami’s Palmetto Expressway in the afternoon.

For a second day, Cuban Americans in Tampa gathered Tuesday at an intersection, blocking traffic and waving Cuban flags.

Like the group in South Florida, Tampa demonstrators attempted to gain access to Interstate 275, but police held them back. Orlando also had hundreds of protesters blocking a busy street for about an hour Tuesday.

With Post wires

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