Deborah Glick blocks building safety measure she once championed

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Deborah Glick blocks building safety measure she once championed

A woke Manhattan Democrat has spent years blocking a building-safety measure she once championed, as she has hauled in tens of thousands of dollars in donations from architecture and engineering special interests that oppose it, records show.

Manhattan Assemblywoman Deborah J. Glick has consistently stymied a bill introduced by her colleague, Democratic Brooklyn Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz, that would suspend professional licenses for architects and engineers who abuse self-certification privileges.

Self certification allows registered engineers and architects to approve projects for construction without any plan examination by the Department of Buildings. The system began in 1995.

“The profit incentive has motivated some professional engineers and registered architects to ignore building codes to satisfy the demands of the owner and/or builder, at times compromising the public’s safety and/or the community’s aesthetics, by self certifying that their projects were code compliant when they were not,” Cymbrowitz wrote in his most recent justification for the bill.

Cymbrowitz has introduced the bill every year since 2011, where it has consistently died in the Higher Education Committee Glick chairs. The bill has long been opposed by industry groups such as the American Institute of Architects.

“You’re going to have to talk to her,” Cymbrowitz said when asked about Glick’s resistance. “I think there might be a sense among staff … that it might be too harsh to the architects.”

A general view of construction cranes at construction sites as seen in New York, NY.
A general view of construction cranes at construction sites as seen in New York, NY.
Christopher Sadowski

Glick had been a fervent opponent of self-certificatiion.

“Although there is not one policy that is to blame for the rash of accidents that the city has endured, the Giuliani era program of self-certification, which is still in place today, is a prime example of a pro-development strategy gone awry,” she said in 2008. “One would think that architects and engineers who have created faulty plans would be disciplined, but this is rarely the case.”

Before being appointed chair of the committee on March 8, 2007, Glick had never taken a donation from either AIA New York or the New York State Society of Professional Engineers, but between 2008 and 2022 she had received at least $27,000 from the organizations spread across 20 donations, records show.

Glick, who faces reelection in 2022, did not respond to multiple requests for comment from The Post.

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