Dems willing ‘to destroy’ Senate for vote reform

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Dems willing 'to destroy' Senate for vote reform

Sen. Ron Johnson blasted Democrats for trying to push voting reform measures through the Senate last week, despite there being no “mandate” for the changes by the American public. 

“We have a 50-50 Senate. There was no mandate to fundamentally change this country. And yet Democrats, except for two, were willing to destroy the institution of the Senate to pass … this election bill,” the Wisconsin Republican told John Catsimatidis on his WABC 770 AM radio show in an interview that aired Sunday.

Johnson said Americans are not “looking for election reform. This is something Democrats want to pass so they can turn this into a one-party state.”

“Show me a person in the recent past who has wanted to vote but couldn’t,” he said, adding that “We’ve made it incredibly easy. Nobody is suppressing the vote.”

Senate Democrats failed in their attempt last week to pass two voting measures — the John Lewis Voting Rights Act and the Freedom to Vote Act — amid opposition by Republicans.

Johnson took exception to Democrats Sen. Joe Manchin and Sen. Krysten Sinema who did not vote to eliminate the filibuster.
Sen. Johnson took exception to Democrats Sen. Joe Manchin and Sen. Krysten Sinema who did not vote to eliminate the filibuster.
EPA/JIM LO SCALZO

Following the defeat over voting reforms, an effort by Democrats to change the filibuster rule to get around the Senate’s 60-vote threshold and pass legislation by a simple majority also failed. 

Two Democrats, Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, joined all Republicans to vote against changing the filibuster. 

Sinema and Manchin and every Republican in the Senate voted against changing the filibuster rule.
Sinema, Manchin and every Republican in the Senate voted against changing the filibuster rule.
Getty Images

Democrats have been pursuing voting reform because they say Republican-led states are passing their own voting measures that make it harder to vote. 

According to the Brennan Center for Justice, which tracks the legislation, at least 19 states passed 34 laws restricting voting access between Jan. 1 and Dec. 7 of last year.

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