Federal government offices closed in DC as winter storm hits

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Federal government offices closed in DC as winter storm hits

Federal government offices and many schools in Washington, DC were closed and hundreds of flights were canceled Monday as a winter storm was expected to dump up to 10 inches of snow on the region.

DC Mayor Muriel Bowser declared a snow emergency Sunday night to remain in effect until 7 p.m. Monday. 

Many COVID-19 testing and vaccination sites also shut down because of the storm.

The US Office of Personnel Management announced that federal government offices would be shuttered but that emergency employees and those who can work from home are expected to keep working. 

President Biden was making his way back to the White House Monday morning after spending the New Year’s holiday in Delaware, but the previously scheduled press briefing was canceled. 

More than half of all flights at Ronald Reagan National Airport, Baltimore/Washington Thurgood Marshall International Airport and Washington Dulles International Airport were canceled or delayed on Monday.​

The National Weather Service issued a warning that between 4 and 8 inches of snow were possible in a region stretching from the Southern Appalachians through the nation’s capital and into southern New Jersey, with some areas likely seeing 8-12 inches. 

Snow falls at the West Wing of the White House.
A winter storm is expected to dump up to 10 inches of snow on the DC area.
Andrew Harnik/AP
Snow falls at the White House.
DC Mayor Muriel Bowser declared a snow emergency Sunday night into Monday evening.
Andrew Harnik/AP
Snow falls at the White House.
Federal government offices are closed but emergency employees and those who can work from home are expected to keep working. 
Andrew Harnik/AP
Snow falls at the White House.
More than half of all flights at DC area airports were canceled or delayed.
Andrew Harnik/AP

“The heaviest snow (2 inches/hour) along with thunder-snow is​ ​likely to occur right after the transition from rain this morning, which will make for tricky commutes to work. Heavy wet snow will also accumulate on power lines leading to power outages​,” the National Weather Service said in a statement, adding that travel conditions could be hazardous.

“The timing of this isn’t great,” National Weather Service meteorologist David Roth told the Associated Press. “For the D.C. area, it’s morning rush hour. At least for places to the northeast, it’ll be closer to midday.”

With Post wires

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