GOP makes gains among Hispanic voters since 2020 election

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GOP makes gains among Hispanic voters since 2020 election

The Republican party has made massive gains among Hispanic voters since the 2020 Presidential Election – cutting the Democratic advantage by nearly 20 percent, according to a new survey. 

Democrats only hold an advantage over Republicans with Hispanic voters at 44 percent to 37 percent, according to the National Republican Congressional Committee’s Battleground Survey Project released Friday.

The margin has significantly narrowed since the 2000 exit polls, which showed that Hispanic voters were 63 percent Democrat and 36 percent Republican, researchers said.

“Hispanic movement toward Republicans is real. Republicans are winning on the issues that matter most to Hispanic voters and are well-positioned to capitalize on Democrats’ extremely unpopular policies,” the NRCC said in a memo outlining the survey. 

RNC Chairman Reince Priebus bangs the gavel to start the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on August 27, 2012 in Tampa, Florida
The survey was conducted among 1,000 registered Hispanic voters from Jan. 29 to Feb. 3.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Delegates wave signs, including a "Latinos for Trump" sign, at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio on Thursday July 21, 2016.
The NRCC’s survey found that Hispanic voters in battleground regions largely favor Republicans in the two chambers.
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Imag

“But this isn’t a done deal. Republican candidates need to continue fighting to win over Hispanic voters with a message focused on the economy and why Republicans are best positioned to protect the American Dream so many Hispanics came to this country to achieve.”

When pressed on specific issues, the survey found that Hispanic voters in battleground districts are “extremely” or “very concerned” about inflation (78 percent), cost of food and groceries (74 percent) and gas prices (70 percent). 

Seventy-four percent of respondents agreed that parents should have a say in what is taught at their children’s schools – a key Republican talking point in recent years – while 22 percent disagreed. 

This installment of the NRCC Battleground Survey Project is a deep dive on a key target group: Hispanic
voters.
The survey looked at 47 battleground districts that have a sizable percentage of Hispanic voters.
NRCC
This installment of the NRCC Battleground Survey Project is a deep dive on a key target group: Hispanic
According to 2020 exit polls, Hispanic voters nationwide voted Democrat over Republican in congressional
races by a wide margin.
NRCC

Overall, 41 percent of battleground Hispanic voters said Republicans are “better able to protect the American Dream,” while 35 percent said Democrats. 

While President Biden has seen his approval rating drop and disapproval rating continuously rise since taking office due to rising inflation, foreign crises and the ongoing border crisis, last week’s survey found that Hispanic voters in battleground states are evenly divided on the job the president is doing, with 46 percent both approving and disapproving. 

Still, 37 percent “strongly disapprove” of Biden’s job as president while only 23 percent “strongly approve.” Even among Independent voters, only 35 percent approve while 49 percent disapprove. 

George Martinez, a Latino Republican CPA, sits on his desk in his office, Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2021, in Winter Springs, Fla.
Seventy-four percent of respondents agreed that parents should have a say in what is taught at their children’s schools.
Phelan M. Ebenhack
Maria Trent, owner of Beyer & Brown, stands in her billiards table showroom Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020, in South Daytona, Fla.
Forty-two percent of respondents said Republicans can handle jobs and the economy better.
Phelan M. Ebenhack

The survey also found that Hispanic voters in battleground states are growing frustrated with key Democratic leaders including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Vice President Kamala Harris. 

Only 21 percent of respondents had “strongly favorable” ratings of Pelosi, while 39 percent had “strongly unfavorable” for her. For the vice president, Harris saw a 23 percent “strongly favorable” rating and 35 percent “strongly unfavorable” ratings. 

As Democrats face a steep climb to keep the majority in the House and Senate during this year’s midterm elections, the NRCC’s survey found that Hispanic voters in battleground regions largely favor Republicans in the two chambers. 

A Latino supporter speaks on stage with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a campaign rally at the Venetian Hotel on October 30, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada
For border security, Hispanic voters favored Republicans.
JOHN GURZINSKI/AFP via Getty Images
A Republican Party elephant logo is pictured with the hair of US President Donald Trump during a demonstration against Washington state's stay-home order at the state capitol in Olympia, Washington, on April 19, 2020.
Overall, 41 percent of battleground Hispanic voters said Republicans are “better able to protect the American Dream.”
JASON REDMOND/AFP via Getty Images

Forty-two percent of respondents said Republicans can handle jobs and the economy better than Democrats which saw 35 percent support.

For border security, Hispanic voters favored Republicans again, with 44 percent saying the GOP can deal with it better than Democrats, which received 31 percent support.

Only 31 percent of respondents said the Democrats can handle rising prices and higher costs of living than Republicans, which saw 49 percent support.

A woman hoods a sign expressing Latino support for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at his campaign rally at the Orange County Fair and Event Center, April 28, 2016, in Costa Mesa
Democrats only hold an advantage over Republicans with Hispanic voters at 44 percent to 37 percent.
DAVID MCNEW/AFP via Getty Images

For crime, 40 percent of Hispanic battleground voters said the GOP can handle it better than Democrats, who only received 32 percent support. 

The survey was conducted among 1,000 registered Hispanic voters from Jan. 29 to Feb. 3 and carries a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percent.

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