House set for debate, vote on Biden’s $1.75T spending plan

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House set for debate, vote on Biden's $1.75T spending plan

The House of Representatives was preparing Thursday to begin debate and a late-night vote on President Biden’s $1.75 trillion social-spending plan following the release of findings from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

The House Rules Committee scheduled an evening meeting to clear the way for Biden’s signature Build Back Better Act — which has no Republican support and has been stalled by members of his own party — to reach the floor.

In a letter to House Democrats, Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said they would soon receive an “updated chart from the White House, reflecting the revised numbers” from the CBO.

Pelosi also said a vote would take place Thursday night “so that we can pass this legislation and achieve President Biden’s vision to Build Back Better!”

Biden has repeatedly claimed that his proposed social and climate spending plan would be fully paid for by tax hikes on high earners and large corporations.

The US Capitol
So far, the CBO has released assessments of 11 sections of the current bill and has found that four of them would increase the federal deficit by a total of more than $900 billion if part of the final legislation.
REUTERS / Joshua Roberts
United States Senator Joe Manchin III
Unified Republican opposition in the House means Democrats can only afford to lose three votes and still pass the bill on to the evenly divided Senate.
EPA / Chris Kleponis

Critics have said the bill’s overall cost would exceed $4 trillion if Democrats hadn’t made temporary some of its programs they would actually like to be permanent. For example, tax credits for children and low-earning workers, top party priorities, are extended for just one year.

Unified Republican opposition in the House means Democrats can only afford to lose three votes and still pass the bill.

If it does pass, the bill is sure to be whittled away at to get it passed in the evenly divided Senate, where moderate Democrats Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona have objected to various aspects and how they are paid for.

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