John Hinckley to be ‘unconditionally released’ 40 years after Reagan assassination attempt

0
20
John Hinckley to be 'unconditionally released' 40 years after Reagan assassination attempt

John Hinckley Jr., the man who tried to assassinate President Ronald Reagan 40 years ago, is set to be “unconditionally released” after reaching an agreement with federal prosecutors.

The agreement to lift Hinckley’s current restrictions was reached during a federal court hearing in D.C. on Monday and will come into effect in June 2022, NBC reports.

The judge agreed to lift all restrictions next year if Hinckley remains mentally stable.

The 66-year-old is currently under court-imposed restrictions after moving from a Washington psychiatric hospital to his mother’s home in Williamsburg, Virginia, in 2016.

He spent 35 years in the psych hospital after being found not guilty by reason of insanity of trying to assassinate Reagan in 1981.

Under the current court-imposed conditions, Hinkley has to have doctors and therapists oversee his psychiatric medication and he is required to attend individual and group therapy sessions.

John Warnock Hinckley Jr was charged with the attempted assassination of President Ronald Regan on March 30, 1981.
John Warnock Hinckley Jr. was charged with the attempted assassination of President Ronald Regan.
FBI HANDOUT

He is also unable to have possession of a gun and is banned from contacting Reagan’s children or actress Jodie Foster, who he was obsessed with at the time of the shooting.

Hinckley’s attorney last month asked for unconditional release, arguing his client was no longer a threat.

Federal prosecutors had opposed ending the restrictions back in May, and retained an expert to determine if Hinkley posed a danger to himself or others if he were to be unconditionally released.

A 2020 violence risk assessment carried out by Washington’s Department of Behavioral Health found Hinckley would no longer pose a danger.

Hinkley was 25 when he shot at Reagan out a Washington DC hotel on March 30, 1981.

The president suffered a gunshot wound to his chest and was hospitalized for nearly two weeks. Three others were also wounded in the shooting.

He was found not guilty by reason of insanity of trying to assassinate the president and was committed to a psychiatric institution. Prior to the assassination attempt, Hinkley had also stalked Foster.

Hinkley won a court battle last year that allowed him to publish his songs online, and potentially make a living as a songwriter.

Police officers and Secret Service agents as they dive to protect President Ronald Reagan.
Police officers and Secret Service agents as they dive to protect President Ronald Reagan.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
President Ronald Reagan moments before his attempted assassination by John Warnock Hinckley Jr.
President Ronald Reagan moments before his attempted assassination by John Warnock Hinckley Jr.
CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images

Since then, he has been posting songs on YouTube under his real name.

With Post wires

Source link