Kamala Harris slammed for mixed messaging on ‘climate crisis’

0
20
Kamala Harris slammed for mixed messaging on 'climate crisis'

Vice President Kamala Harris is under fire after she took a jaunt to Nevada on Air Force Two to tout the administration’s “Build Back Better” agenda and how it can help “tackle the climate crisis” — as critics point out the mixed messages between her words and actions.

In a video tweeted Monday afternoon, Harris was seen exiting a large black SUV before walking towards Air Force Two on the tarmac in Los Angeles. 

“Today I’m heading to Lake Mead in Nevada to discuss the climate crisis — and why we must make historic investments to not only create jobs, but preserve our planet for generations to come,” the accompanying tweet said. 

When in Nevada, Harris further praised the administration’s agenda, noting how investments in cleaner energy and electric vehicles will help tackle the crisis. 

“On the issue of climate, well, the Build Back Better agenda will help us tackle the climate crisis with investments in clean energy and electric vehicles, and so we can reduce emissions. And why do we need to reduce emissions? Because that is part of what is contributing to these drought conditions.”

Vice President Kamala Harris
Kamala Harris was criticized by conservative voices for the plane trip in the name of climate change.
RONDA CHURCHILL/AFP via Getty Images

Netizens quickly began to question the vice president’s use of a plane, especially during a time where video conference calls — such as Zoom calls — have become a part of everyday life due to the pandemic. 

“Nothing conveys your deep concern about carbon emissions than boarding a private jet to fly cross country to ‘discuss’ carbon emissions and how to save the planet from, well, from people like you!” conservative commentator and filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza tweeted. 

Eric Schmitt, Missouri’s Republican attorney general, slammed Harris for lacking self-awareness.

Kamala Harris Air Force Two
Air Force Two is a Boeing 757-200B series aircraft, per the White House.
Kamala Harris/Twitter

“This is about as self aware as hiring child actors to make you look relatable in a video produced by a Canadian company named Sinking Ship Entertainment,” he wrote, referencing a space video featuring the vice president and several child actors that garnered criticism last week. 

Journalist Stephen Miller simply said, “Zoom is available.”

“A motorcade of several SUVs and a Boeing 757 instead of a zoom call really shows you care about the climate ‘crisis,’” blogger and radio host Erick Erickson tweeted.

Vice President Kamala Harris, flanked by Representative Dina Titus (D-Nv) (left) and Representative Susie Lee (D-Nv), gives remarks at sunset view scenic overlook while touring Lake Mead in Boulder City, Nevada.
Vice President Kamala Harris, flanked by Rep. Dina Titus (D-Nev.) (left) and Rep. Susie Lee (D-Nev.), gives remarks at a scenic overlook while touring Lake Mead in Boulder City, Nevada.
EPA/BRIDGET BENNETT / POOL

Harris’ mixed messaging comes one month ahead of the UN Climate Summit in Glasgow. There, the Biden administration plans to flood the zone with 13 high-level cabinet members and officials to meet with other world leaders on creating more commitments to limit global warming, while emphasizing what the US is doing to lower its own greenhouse gas emissions.

Climate activists, like teen Greta Thunberg, have mocked President Biden’s “Build Back Better” agenda, calling it “empty words and promises.”

Air Force Two is a Boeing 757-200B series aircraft, per the White House. Its sister aircraft, Air Force One, is one of the most recognizable symbols of the executive office. 

Vice President Kamala Harris
Kamala Harris’ mixed messaging comes one month ahead of the UN Climate Summit in Glasgow.
RONDA CHURCHILL/AFP via Getty Images

The Air Force touts the aircraft as being “more fuel efficient” and having “improved capabilities over its predecessor,” with a fuel capacity of 92,000 pounds, which comes out to around 11,000 gallons of fuel. The aircraft, which holds 45 passengers, can travel approximately 5,500 nautical miles before needing to be refueled. 

The average Boeing 747-8 international aircraft, which can hold over 400 passengers, carries just over 63,000 gallons of fuel.

Source link