Create & Mail PDF files from Excel 2007

When sending Excel files to co-workers or associates you should be aware that the recipient will able to change the document. Even if you take the time to save the document with a password, the recipient can save the document with a new name, and then modify the document. Now, if you are aware of this that’s no problem. However if you want to protect the document, save the spreadsheet as a PDF. By doing this you will be protection our work from unauthorized changes.

A new feature of Microsoft Excel 2007 (with Microsoft Office Service Pack 2 installed) is the
ability to create and mail Acrobat Reader PDF files. If you do not wish to install Microsoft
Office SP2, you can install just the add-in. You can download it here :
2007 Microsoft Office Add-in: Microsoft Save as PDF

After the add-in is installed you can use the code below or do a manual Save As PDF.
Office Button >Save As ….PDF
Office Button >Send ….PDF

Note: In Excel 2010 the big round Office Button is replaced by File

Tips / warnings :

1) If you have also installed Acrobat Reader you can change OpenAfterPublish in the code to True to open the PDF file after you create it.
2) The mail code example is not working with Outlook Express or Windows Mail.
3) If you set OpenAfterPublish in the code to True then you can do a manual send in
Acrobat Reader (also with Outlook Express or Windows Mail).
4) If there is no printer installed the add-in will not work. You only have to install a printer driver of one of the printers in the default printer list, you not need a real printer to use the add-in.
5) When you use a hyperlink to another place in the workbook or if you use the Hyperlink. worksheet function the hyperlinks are not working in the PDF.

If your workstation still have Microsoft Office 2003 and you would like the upgrade to 2007 please create a Track-It work order requesting an upgrade.

Weekly Tip: Locking your Computer

Keeping your data secure is critical. Allowing others access to your computer is unwise to say the least. Think of walking away with your computer “open” in the same way as walking away with your open purse or wallet unattended in a public place. Now I am fairly certain most people would never intend to leave their open purse or wallet unattended and your computer should be treated in the same manner.

It is very easy to “lock” your computer when you get up from your desk to walk away.  For example, lets say you want to walk away from your desk, and deliver a hot cup of coffee to your IT Manager. Here are some easy directions to lock your PC while you deliver that much needed cup of coffee:

1. via the keyboard
The easiest way to lock Windows XP is by simply pressing the Windows logo key and the letter (for Lock) on a Microsoft Natural Keyboard or any other compatible keyboard that includes the Window key. Doing so will pop up the Unlock Computer Password box.

2. via a Shortcut.
If you don’t have a keyboard with a Window key or simply don’t like the keyboard method, then here’s how you can make a desktop shortcut to lock your computer. 

Right click an empty area of your desktop, choose New/Shortcut and enter this line as the command line:
rundll32.exe user32.dll, LockWorkStation ClickNext. Name the shortcut whatever you prefer and click Finish. That’s it. Pretty simple wouldn’t you say.

There are other ways to lock your workstation such as simply pressing the [ctrl] [alt] and [delete] keys and selecting “lock computer” so please do yourself a favor and lock your computer when you step away from your work area. The data you save may be your own!

Windows Black Screen recap

Following our most recent post last night we believe there may still be confusion related to the Windows Black Screen issue. Following the issue of our fix, which continues to receive significant downloads, we believe that this problem is still affecting a very large number of users in a very diverse range of windows environments. There have been more than 50,000 downloads of the free fix tool since we made it available 5 days ago.

Referring back to the original post where the issue was first highlighted, we stated that there ‘appear’ to be many causes to the black screen issue. In addition, that customers who had experienced the problem in the past two weeks, after the last Windows update (or after running a security programme), our fix will have a high probability of working. We subsequently posted an update stating that following further tests the conditions under which the actual black screen is triggered are spasmodic. Moreover, we stated that some test systems always trigger the condition, others are less consistent and also highlighted two windows patches that seemed common to the issue.

As you will see, at no time have we categorically stated that these patches are the cause of the Black Screen problem. We shared our initial findings around the two patches with Microsoft, conducted further tests and have confirmed that these specific updates are not the root cause.

The emergence of this issue coincided with the recent set of Windows updates, therefore our investigations were focused on identifying if any of these could have been the cause of the problem. We have covered this further in the previous blog.

Regrettably, it is clear that our original blog post has been taken out of context and may have caused an inconvenience for Microsoft. This was never our intention and we have already apologised to Microsoft. Microsoft is a valued partner and our fix was developed to ensure its customers were able to quickly resolve the Black Screen issue without having to reinstall Windows as some users indicated.

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